‘Reflections’ from Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham – ‘African American Studies and The Lessons of Experience’

Presenter Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham

The experiential effects of American racism–the continual lived experiences of racial insult, injustice, and the denial of equal citizenship–led to concerted efforts on the part of African American scholars to pursue the study of their people through multiple academic venues and disciplinary perspectives. Joined by sympathetic white scholars in the decades ahead, they developed a growing body of research that was, in turn, deployed in the real world as a weapon against Jim Crow. The reciprocal roles of academic work and on-the-ground activism appeared prominently on American campuses with the rise of Black Studies in the 1960s and 1970s. These roles remain conjoined in new ways in the twenty-first century.

Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham is the Victor S. Thomas Professor of History and of African and African American Studies at Harvard University. She is also serving in her last year as the chair of the Department of African and African American Studies at Harvard, having held this position since 2006. Prior to coming to Harvard in 1993, Professor Higginbotham was a tenured member of the Department of History at the University of Pennsylvania. She has enjoyed many years as a teacher, beginning her career as a public school teacher in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and in Washington, DC, before moving to the university setting. She has also taught at Dartmouth College and the University of Maryland, as well as holding visiting professorships at New York University and Princeton University. At the special invitation of Duke University, she taught at the Duke Law School in academic year 2010-2011 as the inaugural John Hope Franklin Professor of American Legal History.